A million Apple IDs leaked after suspected FBI breach

By Dave Neal
04 Sep 2012 View Comments
fbi

Hackers operating under the Antisec banner have leaked over one million Apple user IDs that they say they took from the FBI.

The hackers were able to get their hands on the information when they accessed a laptop belonging to an FBI agent, who is named as Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K Stangl.

Further reading

In total they claim to have got hold of over 12 million IDs, but decided that they only needed to release one million.

The leak posted to Pastebin is a reaction to allegedly increased oppression by US authorities and the hackers are unrepentant about it. They have, however, stripped out some of the more personal information.

"We trimmed out other personal data as, full names, cell numbers, addresses, zipcodes, etc. not all devices have the same amount of personal data linked. some devices contained lot of info. others no more than zipcodes or almost anything," says the post accompanying the information.

"We left those main columns we consider enough to help a significant amount of users to look if their devices are listed there or not. the DevTokens are included for those mobile hackers who could figure out some use from the dataset."

The IDs have been published, the hackers say, to prove that the FBI is tracking individuals. The Pastebin statement says that by releasing so many details they hope to raise as much awareness as possible.

"Why exposing this personal data?," they write. "Well we have learnt it seems quite clear nobody pays attention if you just come and say 'hey, FBI is using your device details and info and who the fuck knows what the hell are they experimenting with that', well sorry, but nobody will care. FBI will, as usual, deny or ignore this uncomfortable thingie and everybody will forget the whole thing at amazing speed."

It is expected that releasing so many details will force people to notice. However, those behind the attack say that they have released the data reluctantly and have refused to comment any further.

This story first appeared on Computing sister website www.theinquirer.net

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