Cloud services for retail: 5 main use cases

clock • 8 min read
The coronavirus pandemic has forced companies to re-evaluate their cloud offering
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The coronavirus pandemic has forced companies to re-evaluate their cloud offering

Moving to the cloud brings speed, agility and security, says G-Core Labs' Vsevolod Vayner

4. Protection against DDoS attacks on websites and infrastructure

According to one industry study, more than half of online retailers saw an increase in the frequency and power of DDoS attacks in 2020, and many companies faced ransom demands to stop the attacks.

To enhance the effect of DDoS attacks, criminals strike at critical times, like Black Friday. In addition to loading channels with junk traffic, bot attacks are becoming a serious threat to online retailer's sites. Attackers steal content, hack accounts, and make 'scalper' purchases that distort analytics and slow down the website.

Any infrastructure can be attacked, both classic and cloud. Repelling DDoS attacks aimed at your own equipment, however, requires significant investment. The price of a specialised software and hardware complex can reach hundreds of thousands of dollars - not including technical support, maintenance, and employee salaries.

To save substantial sums of money, it's better to protect comprehensively using a specialised service.

eVitamins case study

eVitamins, an online health and beauty retailer, used to experience significant challenges from attacks of all kinds, from hacking attempts to DDoS attacks. The company used intrusion prevention systems, blocked suspicious IP addresses and analysed logs, but still failed to address the problem. The way out of this situation was to transfer its infrastructure to a public cloud and enable DDoS protection.

Together with cloud services, G-Core Labs offers L3, L4, and L7 DDoS protection for servers and web applications.

5. Development and deployment of internal services

Internal services are no less important in supporting retailer business than client services. They include:

  • Financial and ERP systems
  • Logistics services
  • Self-service portals
  • Internet telephony
  • Information security tools

Moving these services to the cloud has become popular. Retailers have realised that there's no need to host many local servers in branches or stores - it's enough to provide access to the cloud, ensuring that applications are launched and data stored in it.

Brooks Brothers case study

Brooks Brothers, one of the largest US clothing retailers, has deployed its ERP system based on the Hana SAP, which is very demanding on resources, in the cloud. This allowed the retailer to instantly provide internal services for its employees, as well as organise data backups. When it was necessary to enable information security tools (such as two-factor authentication), it was simple to do so in the cloud.

G-Core Labs offers tools for cloud migration of internal services deployed on a traditional architecture.

System performance doesn't degrade during migration. The migration of data and applications is seamless for users. Before migrating, you can conduct an unlimited number of tests based on individual migration plans.

Vsevolod Vayner is head of cloud platforms at G-Core Labs

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