Encryption flaw opened Android and Apple smartphones to online drive-by attacks

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Smartphones easily 'pwned' due to OpenSSL flaw that tricked devices into using decades-old encryption standard

Ninety-five per cent of the world's smartphones in use today have been wide open to a decade-old flaw that would have enabled attackers to steal passwords and other sensitive data. The security ...

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