DDoS attacks cost businesses average of £25,000 per hour finds study

Charlee Gothard
clock • 1 min read

Half of surveyed companies recording £300,000 losses in average six-hour attack

Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are costing companies an average of $40,000 (£25,400) per hour, with around half of attacks lasting at least six hours and costing $500,000 (£317,570) p...

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