University of Leeds issues £6m tender for 'high performance computing' replacement

By Danny Palmer
17 Feb 2014 View Comments
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The University of Leeds is searching for a supplier to replace and expand its high performance computing facilities, as the institution looks to broaden its "research computing" services.

The university is looking for a single supplier to provide high performance computing facilities over a four year period, under a deal worth between £3m and £6m.

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The tender notes that Leeds provides high-powered computing facilities to eight other universities - Durham, Lancaster, Liverpool, Leeds, Manchester, Newcastle, Sheffield and York - as part of a research partnership.

"This is an investment that continues the strong foundation of a sustainable HPC infrastructure at Leeds, supported by all faculties," the tender says.

"The university is keen to continue to develop a broadened ‘research-computing' service taking into account the wider community's evolving aspirations, beyond the traditional computational science and engineering user base.

"To this end, the university wishes to evaluate available technical and commercial solutions that can meet its needs in a cost-effective and energy-efficient manner."

The successful contractor will be guaranteed an initial £1m for beginning the project and an additional £2m before the scheme is reevaluated two years in, with further payments being subject to the success of a mid-term upgrade.

It's expected that between three and 10 service providers will be invited to tender the contract, with operators to be judged on criteria including capacity, past experience, resources, and quality assurance.

According to the tender document, the contract will be awarded to "the most economically advantageous tender in terms of the criteria stated in the specifications".

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