Backbytes: Cameron, #PornoPerry and a potentially libellous remark - UPDATED

By Backbytes
24 Jul 2013 View Comments
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"Tis better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt."

So said former US president Abraham Lincoln. His advice, though, could equally apply to Prime Minister David Cameron and his "muse" on all things internet, Claire Perry.

Further reading

Indeed, it was Perry, who bears more than a passing resemblance to Nicola Murray, that campaigned for the porn filters policy adopted in a blaze of spin this week by Cameron.

Obviously, such a high profile and contentious plan - full of holes and missing details - would naturally attract attention and, sure enough, a day later her website was hacked by "porn pranksters".

But when this was pointed out by popular political blogger Guido Fawkes, aka Paul Staines, illustrated with a screenshot, Perry accused Fawkes of being behind the attack:

Claire Perry
@claire4devizes
"That well known responsible campaigner @GuidoFawkes has been hosting a link that distributed porn via my website".
23 July 13

She then accused Fawkes of "sponsoring" the attack. Perry - now dubbed #pornoperry on Twitter - is a former McKinsey consultant, which makes us wonder about the calibre of recruits these days to the once-famed firm of business fad fetishists.

Fawkes, meanwhile, has now put up a poll on his website, asking whether he ought to sue Perry for libel. Votes are currently running at just under nine-to-one in favour.

Thick-skinned Perry, at the time of writing, still hasn't retracted the remarks or removed the offending tweets. 

UPDATE: The vote is in and it's a landslide to the "sue her for every penny she's got" party, with 2,404 people - or 86.41 per cent of the vote - calling for her head. 

"Reluctantly, Guido has instructed m'learned friends who will be writing to her today..." wrote Fawkes as the result came in. 

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