Analysis: The Apple-Samsung verdict in quotes

By Graeme Burton
28 Aug 2012 View Comments
The iPhone 4v and the Samsung Galaxy smartphone

"The US court ruling reflects the interests of Apple. It's a patriotic ruling in favor of the company from its own country. But the Korean court was not much different from the American one in that it supported Samsung."
Kim Neung-ho, The Korea Times

Further reading

"With a sense of impending doom, Google has already begun attempting to distance itself from the defeat. It knows that with this major victory against Samsung under its belt, Apple's next step will be to take on the Android OS and the company it regards as a traitorous ex-ally, Google. You could say that while the last 18 months has been characterized as Apple versus Samsung, the coming weeks will see the story change to one in which we see Apple take on Google."
Jonny Evans, 'Apple holic', Computerworld

"When it came to the trial, Samsung's lawyers miscalculated in arguing that a verdict for Apple would harm competition in the marketplace. The jurors, led by a foreman who holds his own patent, were more persuaded by Apple's pleas to protect innovation. For them, it ultimately wasn't even a close call."
Dan Levine and Poornima Gupta, Reuters

"Wireless carriers, who already pay hefty subsidies to Apple, have voiced concern that their investment in faster networks could be threatened if devices are taken off the market or innovation is stalled by patent disputes. They have been silent on the impact of Friday's verdict. But they have long sought to promote the development of iPhone competitors to gain more leverage in dealings with Apple."
Jessica E. Vascellaro and Don Clark, Wall Street Journal (subscription required)

"In recent years, I have become even less a fan of Apple. It is now the uber-bully of the technology industry, and is using its surging authority – and vast amounts of cash – in ways that are designed to lock down our future computing and communications in the newest frontier of smartphones and tablets."
Dan Gillmor, The Guardian 

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