Huddle secures vast majority of £453,778 spent on G-Cloud

By Sooraj Shah
15 Jun 2012 View Comments
Cloud computing suppliers announced by government

Privately-held cloud provider Huddle has the highest proportion of the £453,778.38 spent on G-Cloud framework sales, according to data released by the government.

The government launched the CloudStore in February, making 1,700 IT services available to public-sector organisations via the cloud. It published a list of 257 suppliers on the store ranging from smaller SMEs through to major companies like BT, Capgemini and IBM UK.

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Of the suppliers, London-based SME Huddle, which provides an alternative to Microsoft's SharePoint, has secured £402,125, or 89 per cent of the total spent in the first two of months since the release of the G-Cloud framework. It also has six of the 11 contracts awarded so far, including software-as-a-service deals for the Ministry of Justice and the Department for Business Innovation and Skills.

The other companies who have G-Cloud contracts are SME Emergn, public-sector communication provider GovDelivery, environmental intelligence provider Amee and Microsoft Ireland Operations.

There could be further contracts that are not represented in the sales data because of the time it takes to process the information, the government has said.

In a blog, engagement manager of the G-Cloud Programme Eleanor Stewart apologised for the delay in publishing the data and emphasised that the government would attempt to be transparent to the public.

"We've decided to publish these figures regularly on here so it is clear that sales are being made through the framework which we hope will encourage more people to buy through the CloudStore and to demonstrate our commitment to enabling more emerging and SME organisations to supply IT to government and increase the number of examples of acceptable government IT," she said.

 

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